Running and charging for webinars can be a great way to build a following in your niche, demonstrate that you are an expert in your field, and make a profit. Hosting a webinar can be hard work. They need to first be promoted, provide original and valuable information, and include interactive elements so your audience can ask questions and engage with your topic. However, once you have built up a large blog following, each webinar can be extremely profitable.
Multi-vendor marketplaces, like ThemeForest, can be very successful. Chose a niche and create a vendor website for it. Your marketplace could be anything, from a platform for local artists to sell their work on, to an online digital product store. Once set up, invite people in that industry to sell their products on your site. You take a percentage of their profits when items sell.
When was the last time you went to a new restaurant without looking it up online beforehand? Or bought a product that didn’t have at least a few 5-star reviews? It seems like more and more our world is run on reviews. And you can make money online by writing them. Get started by creating accounts on sites like Vindale research, Software Judge, FameBit, CrowdTap, Influence Central, and Modern Mom. However, before you run off and start writing, be sure to check the small print on each of these sites. Writing reviews isn’t a huge source of guaranteed income and you want to make sure that it’s worth your time before you get going.

What the entrepreneurship definition doesn’t tell you is that entrepreneurship is what people do to take their career and dreams into their hands and lead it in the direction of their own choice. It’s about building a life on your own terms. No bosses. No restricting schedules. And no one holding you back. Entrepreneurs are able to take the first step into making the world a better place, for everyone in it.


Santam is passionate about supporting and developing entrepreneurs – the drivers of a new economy. Through our 1001 days series, we’ve brought you lots of insights and advice from business owners who have made it through their first three years of business. Here is a collection of 10 of our all-time best pieces of advice to help you make it as an entrepreneur.
Before we get into the gritty details of The Drum, you should know that they have designated URLs for the Americas, Europe and Asia - with curated geographical content. When you’re looking for pertinent content for yourself and your business, it is incredibly useful to have information sorted geographically. Parallel to this feature, The Drum labels themselves as ‘The global home of media, marketing and advertising’.
If you’re handy or creative, you could craft your products and sell them on sites like Etsy, Amazon, or eBay, straight out of your home. The biggest challenge would be getting discovered, depending on your niche and how viral your products are. But thankfully, there’s tons of advice out there, from pricing your work properly to taking the best photography possible.
The best time for posting is individual for every brand. So, if you want to create a successful online marketing strategy, you will need to refer to your social media insights. Luckily, the majority of social media platforms provide businesses with the information regarding their post views, user engagement, customers geographic, their age, as well as the time when people are the most active. Also, use Google Analytics in order to see when your content is the most popular and share publications around these times for better results. That's #13 on the list of the most effective digital marketing tips for small businesses.
“Ask more questions, always. Assess whether “the one method” people are telling you is the only way to go, even makes sense for you and your topic or audience. I’ve found more engaged audience members and more sales waiting on the other side of ignoring traditional advice and focusing on key questions about what my audience needs than through re-creating systems that others have used. Ask more questions, always. Does it apply to you? How can you use it without the elements of it that you don’t like? What would utterly surprise your audience at this point? If you’re asking yourself “Should I do webinars or a 10-day challenge to promote my course?”, ask instead, “In a world where webinars/challenges don’t exist, how would I ideally help people and share my product with them?” – Regina Anaejionu
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